White Tea – The “Gucci” of Brewed Beverages

June 26, 2008

White tea is a relative newcomer to the North American market place. It is the least processed of all the teas, and has the healthiest profile of all the teas. This tea is made from young leaves and new growth buds. When referring to white teas, it is said it is “two leaves and a bud”. This nickname is because when picked, the youngest and most tender leaves are picked – the top 2 leaves and the bud of the branch.

TeaFrog - Pai Mu Tan White TeaThe oxidization process for white tea is halted almost immediately in white teas, often right in the fields, through heating or steaming. This allows the leaves to retain high concentrations of catechins and other anti-oxidants. Some estates go so far as to shield the buds from the sun to reduce chlorophyll formation.

In recent studies, white tea has been shown to have additional calming and detoxifying effects on the skin, as well as showing the same cancer fighting and anti-oxidizing properties that other teas show. White teas have as much as 3 times as many anti-oxidant polyphenols as other teas, due to the lack of oxidizing that takes place in the processing of this tea. It is much more effective in cleaning up free radicals in the body, which cause skin to sag and age.

Because of the extra high concentrations of the anti-aging and anti-oxidant polyphenols found in white tea, many cosmetic companies are utilizing concentrated white tea in new anti-wrinkle and anti-aging products. Whether these products are effective or not has yet to be proven.

With cancer fighting properties, and anti-aging properties, the velvety smooth taste you get from a quality white tea is a surprising bonus to this extraordinary tea – who says that healthy has to taste bad!

Because the young leaves and buds are used for white tea, it is much more rare than any black or green teas, and is often more expensive. As the health benefits are more widely recognized however, it has become more mainstream, and more available to the western public. TeaFrog has started flavouring white teas to great success, as can be found in our Blueberry Flavoured White tea, Coconut Vanilla White tea and brand new Pink Grapefruit White tea.

So give it a try today. You can purchase a high quality white tea directly from the TeaFrog online store, and have it delivered right to your door!


How to make Green Tea

April 8, 2008

Brew the Perfect Cup of Green TeaIt is surprising how many people give up on Green Tea after one bad experience.  While making Green Tea is not difficult in any way, at TeaFrog we have found that there is one overwhelming mistake that people make with brewing Green Tea, and that is water temperature.

Simply put, do not boil your water when making Green Tea.  If you pour the boiling water over the tea leaves, it will cook the leaves, releasing more tannins and making the tea bitter.  This is the number one reason why people give up on Green Tea!

The optimum temperature for Green Teas is between 80 to 90 degrees Celsius, or 140 – 185 degrees Fahrenheit.  At this temperature, the bulk of the tannins in the tea will not dissolve, leaving you with the natural sweetness of the leaf, and the pure flavor of the tea.  If you happen to boil your water, just give it a few minutes to cool before you infuse your leaves in it.

Another tip when preparing your tea is to ensure that the leaves have enough room to expand fully.  Japanese Green Tea in particular is generally tightly rolled, and as such needs plenty of room to allow the water to get into the inside of the leaf.  You can place the leaves directly in the water, or better yet, use an infuser that allows the tea to expand fully, such as the Finum Brewing Basket.

Step by Step Instructions for Brewing Green Tea.

  1. Heat water in a kettle or pot to a temperature of 80° to 90° C, or between 140° – 185° F.
  2. Place 1 teaspoon of tea into an infusing device that has enough room for the leaves to expand.
  3. Pour your water over the tea leaves.
  4. Allow the tea 2-3 minutes to infuse.
  5. Remove your tea leaves, and enjoy your cup of Green Tea for the first time!

Green Tea Brewing Tips

– you can infuse green tea many times.  Some teas do not fully release their flavor until the second or third infusion!  Use an infuser, such as the Finum Brewing Basket, to make second, third and fourth infusions easy.

– experiment with the infusion times for your Green Tea.  Some teas are best infused for only 1 or 2 minutes, some as much as 7 minutes.  Tea is a personal choice, so find the right brewing time just for you.

– water quality can affect the taste of tea.  If you have hard water out of the tap, try using filtered water to experience the true flavor of your Green Tea

Varieties of Teas

TeaFrog carries a few varieties of the most popular Green Teas.  We carry quality Japanese Teas such as:

Genmaicha Organic Green Tea – A blend of Sencha Tea and roasted brown rice is a staple in Japanese restaurants all over the world.  This tea produces a sweet nutty infusion that can be enjoyed hot or cold.

Sencha Fukujyu – Long dark leaves and a light infusion, this popular Japanese Green Tea is rich in vitamin C as well as the other natural elements in Green Tea. Smooth and sweet tasting.

TeaFrog also carries a number of high quality Chinese Teas:

Dragon Well – Lung Ching – this rare wok roasted tea produces a refreshing yellow and orange infusion with a slightly nutty flavor.

Gunpowder – named for the look of the rolled leaves, this distinct tea has a light taste and is a conversation piece as well!

Jasmine Chung Hao – this top quality Chinese Green Tea is infused with the flavor of Jasmine Flowers by layering the tea over real Jasmine.  A soothing and relaxing cup of tea for any time of the day.

This is only a sampling of the Green Teas that TeaFrog has to offer, so visit our website and introduce them into your lifestyle!